Our Mission

At S S Water Corporation - Supplying the Rural Water needs of the community near LaVernia, Floresville, Stockdale, Adkins and Sutherland Springs, Texas. Building a water source that can be trusted and helping to grow a healthy community.

Paperless Billing

Want your S S Water Supply Statement Now? You can have a PDF version of the statement at your finger tip as soon as they are ready to mail!  No more waiting or relying on the mail for your water bill.  Learn More...

Service Outages

Click below for an up to the minute snapshot of service outages in your area. Just another way S S Water Corporation is working harder and smarter to better serve our customers.

Service OutagesClick Here for Current Outages

Recent News

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Water Main Break

Water Main Break is Causing Water Outage!

Water Main Break on CR 357. Crews are on location. Water will be out of service for several hours to repair this major break. We will continue to update our website and Facebook pages as we have a better estimate of the time frame.

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Winging South for the Winter

Winging South for the Winter

As the days grow shorter and the nights grow colder; as long, languid summer melts into crisp, cool autumn; as nature takes on russet hues and puts on fancy dress; as you marvel at the beauty of the season, don’t forget to look up. One of nature’s great marvels is the show in the sky as the birds of North America migrate south. Migration is the annual movement of birds, often north and south along a flyway, between their breeding grounds and their wintering grounds. One of the best known, and certainly the most familiar, of North America’s migrators is the Canada (not “Canadian”) Goose (Branta canadensis).  The impressive V-formations of Canada geese flying south are seen all over North America; indeed, Canada geese are found in every one of the contiguous United States and every Canadian province. However, they are not our only journeying birds. “Of the more than 650 species of North American breeding birds, more than half are migratory.” Cornell Lab of Ornithology

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